Thank you

Thank you

This year has been a trying time for all small businesses we've chosen to permanently close operations at Aquil.io. Curtis and I began this enterprise with a belief that there was a need for a higher attention to detail in software development. Keeping a small team of focused and talented individuals granted us the ability to work on interesting projects with amazing clients.
On the fly: Live coding a new version of feathers-batch

On the fly: Live coding a new version of feathers-batch

We recently had David Luecke in our virtual studio to live-code a new version of feathers-batch! If you're interested in seeing a bit behind the scenes, watch the latest episode and read more about the specifics on the latest version of feathers-batch in the latest article from the FeathersJS blog.
Announcing the Aquil.io store

Announcing the Aquil.io store

We have designed a number of t-shirts for FeathersJS, available in our new store. At Aquil.io, we use Feathers on a daily basis. This is a choice we evaluate at the start of every project we onboard. Feathers has consistently enhanced our ability to deliver quality software with greater efficiency. The swag store is one aspect of an avenue where we strive to give back and keep the community thriving.
Tools, projects, and examples for FeathersJS developers in 2020

Tools, projects, and examples for FeathersJS developers in 2020

As any JavaScript framework community grows, it becomes difficult to navigate which avenues developers have to look for solutions to problems they have encountered. FeathersJS has continually been at the forefront of JavaScript discussions since its inception, as illustrated in the annual State of JS survey. We created FeathersJS Resources as a hub, or rather a starting point, to assist people in the Feathers community find what they may be searching for.
How we debug Feathers APIs using Postman

How we debug Feathers APIs using Postman

At Aquil.io, developing APIs and collaborating with clients walk hand in hand. Communication is essential in any consulting environment, and explaining information about a Feathers service is most effectively done with executable code, close to the metal.
Karma Driven Development

Karma Driven Development

In this Wild West era of software development, rules are few and far between on how we choose tech stacks, architect applications, or manage teams. Anyone who has spent time on more than one team witnesses a wide variance of philosophies and approaches. Throughout our careers as software developers, one goal should remain constant: "Do the right thing."
Archiving the ReleaseHawk project

Archiving the ReleaseHawk project

In late 2017 we started working on a side project which had a unique requirement: monitor a dependency which is not an NPM module. In our specific case, we needed to monitor a GitHub repository for changes. If you are familiar with projects such as Dependabot, the requirement is identical. ReleaseHawk was born out of these efforts and published to the GitHub marketplace.
Introducing ReleaseHawk

Introducing ReleaseHawk

Today we're launching ReleaseHawk— a GitHub app that manages your dependencies that live outside your package manager. In today's environment, we've grown accustomed to having our dependencies come from a package manager, such as NPM, Maven, or NuGet.
Release: heroprotocol-node

Release: heroprotocol-node

heroprotocol is a python library provided by Blizzard, parsing MPQ files created by Heroes of the Storm. heroprotocol-node is a NodeJS wrapper, allowing you to generate the underlying reports as JSON objects.
FeathersJS and Google OAuth 2.0

FeathersJS and Google OAuth 2.0

FeathersJS is an abstraction layer for building WebSocket and REST APIs. This framework includes plugins, such as handling JWT-based authentication, for use with many existing authentication schemes. This article acts as an example for integrating a Feathers application with Google as an OAuth 2.0 provider.
A comparison between WebSockets, server-sent events, and polling

A comparison between WebSockets, server-sent events, and polling

Comparisons of mechanisms to implement a "real-time" behavior in web applications often touch on API differences, however neglect performance and request overhead in such implementations. This article provides metrics for HTTP long-polling, HTTP short-polling, server-sent events, and WebSockets in the form of bandwidth per request. The primary audience of this article is a seasoned web developer or library author, however web developers of all skill levels may benefit from the following material.
Project: Gambit

Project: Gambit

Gambit aims to provide the tools and visual cues necessary for a more accurate analysis at a micro level.